Can You Shrink The Size of Your Pores?

Although you can’t change the size of your pores, there are many ways to minimize their appearance.

Beautiful Women

Like many things about your body, pore size is genetically determined and cannot be changed. If you were born with large pores, then you’ll always have large pores. There is, however, some good news: You can minimize the appearance of large pores. Here’s how:

1. Sebaceous glands pump out oil that fills pores making them appear larger. By reducing the oil that’s produced you can temporarily “minimize” large pores. Try a lactic-acid-based toner or alpha-hydroxy-acid-based peel pads such as Bliss Steep Clean Mattifying Toner Pads.

2. Unclog your pores. Clogged pores that are full of trapped dead skin cells appear larger, so unclogging can make them appear smaller. Look for products containing glycolic acid such as DCL Glycolic Acid Pads 10%. Other effective ingredients include salicylic acid, and retinoids such as trentinoin, which is a prescription.

3. Exfoliate. There are two types of exfoliators: Physical exfoliators are scrubs that unclog your pores through friction. Chemical exfoliators such as alpha hydroxy acids and retinoids dissolve the sticky glue-like substance that clogs the pores; no scrubbing is needed. When you exfoliate, you remove dead skin cells from the upper skin layer revealing new skin that looks brighter and smoother and feels significantly softer. It’s easy to overdo exfoliation, so be careful. Once to twice a week is enough for most people. If your skin becomes red, dry, or irritated, stop exfoliating.

4. Use a make-up primer. Primers such as L’Oreal Studio Secrets Professional Base, Magic Perfecting, fill in the pores, making them look smaller and providing a smooth base for your make-up.

How about you? Got any favorite products that help minimize the appearance of pores? If so, share them with us in the comment section below.

Photo credit: FCC, RLJ Photography, NYC

Fall Is Here, Time To Change Skincare Products In Your Vanity

What I Wore: The Editor

Fall is finally here. It’s time to change the clothes in your wardrobe to knee-length pencil skirts, motorcycle leather jackets, and animal print handbags, says Vogue. It’s also time to change your skincare products, says @dermdoc.

Most of us associate changing seasons with changing wardrobes, but it’s also the time to evaluate your skincare routine. Humid, warm air will change to dry, cool air like greens to reds on maple trees. Your skin is a living organ and actively responds to these environmental changes.

  • Dry air means your skin will produce more oils to protect itself.
  • Cool air means that previously flushed skin will pale.
  • Less sun means that thick skin will shrink.
  • Less ultraviolet B light means that tanned skin will fade to allow for maximum vitamin D production.

When you start packing away your shorts and spaghetti strap dresses, remember that your skin needs you to pack away some of your summer products.

  • Dryer, thinner skin is more sensitive; consider exfoliating less frequently. Some scrubs or at-home microdermabrasions should be reduced to once every few days or week.
  • Some retinoids like Retin-A or Renova, can be reduced from every day to every other day to minimize irritation in fall and winter.
  • Listen to your skin. Is it increasingly red and stinging as the weather changes? You might have to stop some peels or toners completely until springtime.
  • Consider switching soapy facial washes to soothing or creamy facial cleansers.
  • Change from a lotion moisturizer to a cream moisturizer. If you haven’t moisturized every day, then you should start now.
  • Use a facial moisturizer, particularly if you’re prone to acne or have excessively dry facial skin.
  • Depending on how far north you live and on your skin tone, you might be able to cut back on sunscreen for winter. Although complete sun protection is the best way minimize all damage to your skin, wearing sunscreen year-round may not be necessary. If you’re not sure, talk to your dermatologist.
  • Remember that even in winter, at high altitudes and where the ground is covered with snow, ultraviolet light can be strong, more like summertime sun. So you always need sunblock when skiing or snowboarding.

Photo credit: FCC, Jessica Quirk