Think Before You Ink: The Truth About Tattoo Removal

Tattoo

Maybe it’s because I’m a dermatologist, but there’s one thing I’m certain about when it comes to tattoos: Many people who have them wish that there was an easy way to remove them.

A recent survey from England shows that close to 1/3 of people end up regretting their tattoos and that men are twice as likely as women to suffer such regret.

The first thing to realize about tattoos is that the ink is placed in the dermis, which is the deeper layer of the skin. The dermis is where all the connective tissue lies that make up the structure of your skin. It is also the layer of skin that leaves a scar if damaged. Superficial damage to your skin can typically heal with little or no residual mark. However, when the deeper layers of the skin are damaged, the tissue cannot repair itself without leaving a scar. This is an important point to consider before getting a tattoo.

Because the ink is deep in the skin, there is no cream or ointment that can get rid of a tattoo without leaving a scar. Although there are no shortage of websites claiming to remove your unwanted tattoo by applying their special cream or ointment, I know of none that is effective. It is not possible to bleach the pigment down deep without damaging the skin at the surface. Chemical treatments or acids that claim to get rid of tattoos could only do so by leaving a significant scar, like a third degree burn.

Lasers tattoo removal works best. It can eliminate a tattoo by targeting the pigment. Since different lasers target different ink colors, they can more effectively blast the tiny ink fragments.. The blast and destruction of the ink triggers your immune system to come in and clean up the spots, carrying the ink with it. Because the laser targets only the color, it is able to treat the tattoo that is deep in your skin while leaving the surface of your skin undamaged. Professional tattoos tend to use a higher quality ink in higher quantities, which makes complete tattoo removal difficult. Therefore, realize that oftentimes a shadow of the tattoo remains even after extensive or repeated laser treatments.

Newer tattoo inks have been developed that are engineered specifically to be good targets for the laser. The laser is more easily able destroy these pigments, and the tattoo can be removed entirely, without any residual color. You might want to ask your tattoo artist about this ink before you get your tattoo.

If you decide to remove your tattoo, then make an appointment with a board-certified dermatologist who has experience with laser tattoo removal. Realize that different color inks require different lasers; black and red inks are easier to remove. Most patients need several treatments over a period of months to fully remove a tattoo, depending on the color and size of the tattoo and your skin color.

Keep in mind that laser tattoo removal is timely and expensive. Treatment sessions can be several hundred dollars each, and most people need several sessions over the course of many months. Even so, some tattoos are never completely removed.

So, please, think before you ink. It could save you a lot of time and money if the day comes when you no longer want it.

Photo credit: FCC, Jhong Dizon

How to Treat Keratosis Pilaris or “Chicken Skin”

If you have tiny bumps on the backs of your arms or on your thighs, you likely have keratosis pilaris or “chicken skin,” is a common, genetic skin disorder, that can be treated with many OTC products.

Homemade OvenFried Chicken Raw

If you’ve got tiny, dry bumps on your thighs, then you likely have keratosis pilaris (KP). KP is a common, harmless, genetic skin condition caused by a buildup of the protein keratin that plugs up the hair follicle, resulting in an acne-like bump that can be either white or red in color. Since it resembles goosebumps, KP is often referred to, albeit ungraciously, as “chicken skin.”

Keratosis pilaris most commonly occurs on the backs of the upper arms and on the thighs, and less commonly on the face, neck, and buttocks. Although adults can develop KP, it’s most common in children and adolescents who as they age, typically outgrow it.

Although it’s benign, KP can be unsightly and embarrassing, leading many sufferers to hide their skin and avoid wearing sleeveless shirts and shorts.

How do you treat keratosis pilaris? Although you can’t be cured of KP, there are several things you can do to reduce the bumps and improve your skin’s overall appearance:

1. Moisturize daily. Moisturizing daily, particularly after showering or bathing when the skin is still damp, is one of the most effective and inexpensive ways to treat KP. Moisturizing is especially important during cold weather months when KP often worsens.

2. Look for products containing lactic acid, glycolic acid, or urea. Many over-the-counter lotions and creams contain these ingredients that help exfoliate dead skin, making skin feel smoother and softer. With prolonged use, they can help remove bumps and improve the appearance of your skin. Always use gentle moisturizing body washes that both cleanse and moisturize the skin.

4. Consult your dermatologist. If you haven’t had any improvement with OTC products, then talk with your dermatologist about other options. Prescription retinoids can help KP, and in some severe cases, laser treatments can be used.

Photo credit: FCC, snowpea&bokchoy